Project Description

Charlie Chaplin: Pay Day

A very warm welcome to the eighth in our series of monthly releases of limited edition Charlie Chaplin photographs for 2019—part of our celebration of the 130th anniversary of his birth—where each month we focus on a key Charlie Chaplin film.  

Over the course of 2019 we will build a substantial collection of important Charlie Chaplin photographs—all of which are available to purchase and hang on your walls at home or in your office. You can see photographs from previous months here.

This month we offer a collection of images from Charlie Chaplin’s 1922 film, Pay Day. The images that follow are available to purchase in limited editions as museum-quality archival handmade silver gelatin photographs, in a range of sizes from 10 x 12 inches to 48 x 60 inches. Scroll down and select an image for full details.

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AN INTRODUCTION TO PAY DAY (1922)

Pay Day was Charlie Chaplin’s penultimate film for First National.

Pay Day marks the final two-reeler comedy showcasing the iconic character, the Little Tramp. In this production, the Little Tramp deviates from his usual role as an outsider from society and instead plays the part of an ordinary man with a house, an overbearing wife and a mundane job–a character that the audience could no doubt relate to  more easily. The opening scene portrays Chaplin working on a construction site, in which he closely and unknowingly escapes accident after accident throughout his morning’s work.

Over the course of the film, a series of Chaplin-esque gags and slapstick comedy continue as the Tramp gets into trouble with his boss, his wife and encounters an accident-ridden journey home. Once the Tramp eventually makes it home and unwittingly falls asleep in the bath, he is woken moments later by his alarm as it is time for another day of work.

To say that the filming for this production was smooth-sailing would be an understatement. Chaplin shot all footage for the night-time scenes over just four nights and all shooting was complete within one month. Chaplin demonstrates an incredible ability to portray the monotonous lifestyle of laborers who desperately search an escape from their job and family demands for a few hours before it begins all over again. For this reason, the everyday viewer could relate to the construction worker and unsurprisingly Pay Day was another well-received Chaplin production.

The Laborer and the foreman

The Laborer and the foreman
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The Laborer is late to work, so offers the construction-site foreman (Mack Swain) a peace lily.

The foreman’s daughter

The foreman’s daughter
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The Laborer is smitten with the foreman’s daughter (Edna Purviance).

Stuck in the rain

Stuck in the rain
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The Laborer gets stuck in the rain after a drunken brawl.

The bathtub

The bathtub
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It’s after 5am when the Laborer arrives home and has to deal with his formidable wife (Phyllis Allen) who wakes to find him asleep in their full bathtub.

The hallway

The hallway
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The Laborer reaches for his hidden spare change on his way to work the following morning only to be stopped in his tracks by his angry wife.

 Want to see more?

To find out all about our plans for 2019—in which we celebrate the genius of Charlie Chaplin—just click on the green button below, and read on.

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Charlie Chaplin ™ © Bubbles Incorporated SA 2019
Photographs © Roy Export S.A.S / Roy Export Co. Ltd
Scans by Cineteca di Bologna / Musée de l’Elysée