Project Description

Charlie Chaplin: A Day’s Pleasure

A very warm welcome to the seventh in our series of monthly releases of limited edition Charlie Chaplin photographs for 2019—part of our celebration of the 130th anniversary of his birth—where each month we focus on a key Charlie Chaplin film.  

Over the course of 2019 we will build a substantial collection of important Charlie Chaplin photographs—all of which are available to purchase and hang on your walls at home or in your office. You can see photographs from previous months here.

This month we offer a collection of images from Charlie Chaplin’s 1919 film, A Day’s Pleasure—a smaller selection than in previous months.

The images that follow are available to purchase in limited editions as museum-quality archival handmade silver gelatin photographs, in a range of sizes from 10 x 12 inches to 48 x 60 inches.

Scroll down and select an image for full details.

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AN INTRODUCTION TO A DAY’S PLEASURE (1919)

A Day’s Pleasure was Charlie Chaplin’s fifth film for First National.

One of his shortest films, A Day’s Pleasure is just two reels long, lasting for approximately twenty minutes.

Chaplin does not play the tramp–instead taking the part of a husband taking his wife and two children out for a boat trip. Chaplin built up a series of mishaps for his character and others over the course of the short film, including a misfunctioning car, seasickness, a dispute with a jealous husband, angry motorists, a sticky time with a barrel of tar and a bad tempered cop. 

The shooting of A Day’s Pleasure began on 30 June 1919 with the traffic jam scene. This scene was soon completed on 9 July. Chaplin’s first son, Norman Spencer Chaplin, was born on 7 July 1919 with severe disabilities that required urgent surgery. Tragically, Norman died on 10 July 1919 and the production of A Day’s Pleasure, or Chaplin’s Picnic as it was originally titled, was abandoned.

After significant pressure from the distribution company for the release of another Chaplin film, the production of A Day’s Pleasure was picked up once again. Chaplain rented a pleasure boat and all remaining filming was completed in just over a week.

 

That’s my seat

That’s my seat
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On a pleasure boat, the family are harassed by a bully, played by Tom Wilson, who takes Charlie’s seat.

The rescue

The rescue
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Charlie and the bully pull a woman into the boat as it begins to depart.

Traffic

Traffic
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Charlie argues with a traffic cop as he tries to escape the traffic jam.

Charlie gets stuck in tar

Charlie gets stuck in tar
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Bystanders watch and laugh when Charlie ducks and weaves as he takes on the traffic cop.

The crossroads – the empty set

The crossroads – the empty set
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Photographs such as this—which document the empty set where important film action took place—will be a feature of each collection of photographs we launch throughout 2019.

Even though this photograph acts as a simple photographic record of the set layout, it is remarkably evocative—it is impossible to look at this photograph without thinking of the action that took place there.

 Want to see more?

To find out all about our plans for 2019—in which we celebrate the genius of Charlie Chaplin—just click on the green button below, and read on.

Back to the Charlie Chaplin main page

Charlie Chaplin ™ © Bubbles Incorporated SA 2019
Photographs © Roy Export S.A.S / Roy Export Co. Ltd
Scans by Cineteca di Bologna / Musée de l’Elysée